LAST MAN STANDING 2014

 

You will never know your limits until you push yourself through them.

Last Man Standing 2014. My first ever CrossFit Competition...

It was awesome, it was awful, it was extreme, it was challenging, it was painful, it was exhilarating,  it was everything  a CrossFit competition should be.

Going into the 2 day individuals competition in the intermediate category I didn't have any expectations of making the finals, but I did, and I ended in 16th place out of 208 athletes.

I was proud and I was hooked....

Here are a few things I learned from my first CrossFit Competition:

1. BIGGER IS NOT ALWAYS STRONGER..

With an event of more than 550 athletes competing, Beginner, Intermediate & Elite categories,  you pretty much have a big spread of individuals walking about and in temperates of 33C+ the shirts do come off quickly during WOD time!
It is pretty easy to get intimidated by the "big boys" in your heat. 

Nevertheless, I did fairly well on all 5 WOD's competing against guys much bigger than me, way less body fat and much more defined. However, time and time again it showed that in CrossFit, you need to be good in all the ten aspects of CrossFit:

Cardio
Stamina
Strength
Flexibility
Power
Speed
Co-Ordination
Agility
Balance
Accuracy

Being "good' on all ten these aspects will make you a STRONG athlete.

"Big ain't strong, strong is strong"

2. EVERYBODY IS GOOD AT SOMETHING:

I will be the first to admit that I fall short in a lot of aspects of CrossFit.It is easy to get overwhelmed by the different CrossFit movements. Gymnastic movements for instance is not my forte and neither are burpee's (dont think burpee's are anyone's forte!)

I like to row and I like Olympic Lifting. I am pretty good at those.. Luckily for me, there were a few of these incorporated during the WOD's of the weekend.  

However, watching different heats and looking at the leaderboard after each WOD, names shift up and down like a ping pong ball. No one is good at everything. You might love pull ups or be good at Snatches while the person next to you will thrive on double or single unders. The beautiful thing of CrossFit is that you will find one thing at least that you are good at, then move on to work on your weaknesses which will then become another strength and you can pursue another weakness. Its a vicious circle but it will make you a stronger athlete brimming with confidence

3. CROSSFIT IS A COMMUNITY

With so many spectators filling the stands and grass areas at Supersport Park Cricket Stadium this weekend it once again became clear to me that the CrossFit community does care. I saw great feats of camaraderie, strangers shouting their lungs out for people they don't even know, helping them pushing through their physical and mental boundaries.

Athletes were high five'ing the very ones they were competing against the lane next to them, nervous laughters were shared and hands of support were thrown out when the bodies hit the floor, literally, after each WOD

Once again it showed me....Anything is Possible.

CrossFit is a sport of skill, not just of fitness. You need the strength of a Silverback Gorilla, the speed of a Cobra, the flexibility of a gymnast and dogged determination!

Thanks to LMS 360 Staff and Organizers and a special Shout out to the excellent Judges at each heat!



 

Barry Oberholzer

TerrorTech, 30 Wall Street, New York, NY, 10005

Born in Houston, Texas, a former professional rugby player and current CrossFit and Ironman athlete, Barry  is the founder of TerrorMate app and is a counter-terrorism and intelligence expert. Formerly Barry served as a confidential informant for Department of Homeland Security, Joint Terrorism Task Force, Belgium Customs Intelligence and HM Revenue & Customs Intelligence in the United Kingdom. 

One of his most impactful successes was in his identification of Iranian sanction busting syndicates who smuggled US manufactured aircraft and parts to Iran which led to the arrests of several prominent international businessmen. He also had numerous successes in major illicit cigarette seizures in Europe.